For the Love of Everything Holy, Stop Using IE and Safari!

This is a relatively old tech story (it’s from three weeks ago), but I love it, so I just have to share it with you all.

Apparently there is an annual hackers conference called PWN 2 OWN, and at this conference the sponsors shell out big bucks ($15,000) for the fastest person or team to successfully hack a web browser. Hackers signed up for which browser they wanted to attempt, and then it was game time.

This year, Google sweetened the deal and offered $20,000 for anyone who could hack their Chrome browser. Nice.

To nobody’s surprise, Internet Explorer fared horribly, falling shortly after the contest began. But even before IE8 was defeated, Apple’s Safari browser was made the laughingstock of the internet browsing world.

It took exactly five seconds for someone to hack Safari.

Five seconds!

Meanwhile, only two people signed up for a chance to take on Chrome, and they both backed out — not even willing to make an attempt at Google’s security. And Firefox was never compromised either.

Those results ought to give you a big hint about what web browsers would be the best to use. And I will say – not only is Chrome secure, it is small, sleek, and speedy as well. Go download it! Or at least get Firefox. Your computer and all your personal information will thank you.

Android Finally Claims #1 Marketshare for Mobile OS

The Android reign has finally begun in the land of mobile operating systems — although it may be short-lived, as these numbers come from January, the last month before the iPhone was available on Verizon.

According to Nielson, here is the January market share (with December percentages in parentheses):

1. Android – 29% (27)
2. Apple – 27% (28)
3. RIM – 27% (27)

It doesn’t look like much movement, but the trends have been consistent. One year ago, Google was on bottom of the pack with just 10% of the market, while Apple had 27% and RIM had 36%. It looks like Blackberry may have found their floor, as they have plateaued at 27% for the last five months or so now. But Apple just can’t gain any traction at all, staying at the same 27% for the last year and a half.

We’ll see how the February numbers look next month — could Verizon be Apple’s savior and stop Google’s steady march to domination?

Three-way Tie in Smartphone OS Market Share

The latest numbers on smartphone OS market share are out from Nielsen (Dec 2010), and they show the movement we expected from November’s numbers: Apple down and Android up, resulting in what Nielsen is calling a three-way tie for market share:

Of course, these numbers are poised to change dramatically when the February numbers are released two months from now, since Verizon subscribers getting the iPhone would assumedly boost Apple’s market share. We shall see.

Until then, Google’s Android has all the momentum. For folks who purchased a smartphone in the past six months, 43% chose an Android phone (up from 41% in Novemeber) compared to just 26% choosing Apple (down from 27%).

Nielsen also broke down market share by ethnicity which led to some interesting stats. Among Hispanics the three leading operating systems are essentially tied. Among whites Apple has a small lead (29-25) over Android. Among African Americans, Blackberry and Android are close in the top two with Apple way behind. And among Asians, Apple nearly doubles the other two OS’s.

The Internets

Mashable has some pretty interesting statistics about the internet and its use in 2010. They call it “the staggering size of the internet”, but what I found more interesting was how people were using it.

Specifically, it appears a lot of people are still using the web to send spam email. Out of the 107 trillion email messages that were sent in 2010, 89% of them were spam. That’s over 95 trillion spam messages that were flooding inboxes last year.

That’s a lot of Nigerian princes.

Makes me glad for the spam filter on GMail.

Even more interesting were the spam messages broken down by region. Of those 95 trillion spam emails:

  • 39% were in Europe,
  • 34% were in Asia,
  • 13% were in Latin America,
  • 10% were in North America,
  • 3% were in Africa, and
  • 1% were in Australia/Oceania.

Not only is New Zealand a gorgeous place to live, apparently it is nearly spam-free as well. That settles it, we’re moving.

At any rate, here is a slightly more useful statistic (but only slightly): worldwide web browser marketshare:

  1. Internet Explorer – 47%
  2. Firefox – 31%
  3. Chrome – 15%
  4. Safari – 5%
  5. Opera – 2%

This looks nearly exactly like the regional numbers that came out last month. In case you’re wondering, 57% of Reflected Riddles readers use Chrome, 22% use Firefox, and just 6% use IE. Good for you guys. Heh.

The Internets

Mashable has some pretty interesting statistics about the internet and its use in 2010. They call it “the staggering size of the internet”, but what I found more interesting was how people were using it.

Specifically, it appears a lot of people are still using the web to send spam email. Out of the 107 trillion email messages that were sent in 2010, 89% of them were spam. That’s over 95 trillion spam messages that were flooding inboxes last year.

That’s a lot of Nigerian princes.

Makes me glad for the spam filter on GMail.

Even more interesting were the spam messages broken down by region. Of those 95 trillion spam emails:

  • 39% were in Europe,
  • 34% were in Asia,
  • 13% were in Latin America,
  • 10% were in North America,
  • 3% were in Africa, and
  • 1% were in Australia/Oceania.

Not only is New Zealand a gorgeous place to live, apparently it is nearly spam-free as well. That settles it, we’re moving.

At any rate, here is a slightly more useful statistic (but only slightly): worldwide web browser marketshare:

  1. Internet Explorer – 47%
  2. Firefox – 31%
  3. Chrome – 15%
  4. Safari – 5%
  5. Opera – 2%

This looks nearly exactly like the regional numbers that came out last month. In case you’re wondering, 57% of Reflected Riddles readers use Chrome, 22% use Firefox, and just 6% use IE. Good for you guys. Heh.

Starbucks Now Accepts Payment Via Cell Phone

This is pretty cool. Download an app onto your smartphone and load some money on to it. Then, when you’re at Starbucks, the app creates a barcode on your cell phone screen that you hold up to a Starbucks scanner. The scanner deducts the money from the phone app, and you get your coffee.

The future is here. :)

Seriously, this is some cool stuff and I could see many companies making use of this technology in the very near future. It’s a quick, painless way to pay for stuff – easier than a check (which hardly any stores take any more anyways), better than carrying around cash with you, and quicker and easier than a credit card.

It’s another step forward into the convergent era of technology where devices are no longer fragmented — the fewer devices you need, the better. I can’t wait to try this out. The app is currently available for Apple and Blackberry and is coming soon for Android.

Starbucks Now Accepts Payment Via Cell Phone

This is pretty cool. Download an app onto your smartphone and load some money on to it. Then, when you’re at Starbucks, the app creates a barcode on your cell phone screen that you hold up to a Starbucks scanner. The scanner deducts the money from the phone app, and you get your coffee.

The future is here. :)

Seriously, this is some cool stuff and I could see many companies making use of this technology in the very near future. It’s a quick, painless way to pay for stuff – easier than a check (which hardly any stores take any more anyways), better than carrying around cash with you, and quicker and easier than a credit card.

It’s another step forward into the convergent era of technology where devices are no longer fragmented — the fewer devices you need, the better. I can’t wait to try this out. The app is currently available for Apple and Blackberry and is coming soon for Android.

Firefox Grabs #1 Spot in Europe, Chrome Gaining on IE

Statcounter released a December market share analysis of web browsers across the world, and some of the results were quite surprising — including the big headline that Internet Explorer is no longer the #1 web browser in Europe. The European numbers:

1. Mozilla Firefox – 38.11% (40.8%)
2. Microsoft Internet Explorer – 37.52% (44.84%)
3. Google Chrome – 14.58% (5.06%)
4. Apple Safari – 4.62% (3.4%)

As always, the more interesting thing than the topline numbers are the trends. The numbers in parentheses above are the market share percentages for each browser in December 2009 – one year ago. As you can see, Google is the only browser to experience significant growth in Europe over the past year.

And the North American numbers:

1. Internet Explorer – 48.92% (53.84%)
2. Firefox – 26.7% (30.68%)
3. Google Chrome – 12.82% (5.31%)
4. Apple Safari – 10.16% (7.94%)

The trends are generally the same across the world – IE slowly dripping support, Firefox flat to slightly down, and Chrome and Safari steadily gaining. Will the next generation of web users use Chrome and Safari as their preferred browsers, leaving Microsoft and Mozilla in the dust?

Firefox Grabs #1 Spot in Europe, Chrome Gaining on IE

Statcounter released a December market share analysis of web browsers across the world, and some of the results were quite surprising — including the big headline that Internet Explorer is no longer the #1 web browser in Europe. The European numbers:

1. Mozilla Firefox – 38.11% (40.8%)
2. Microsoft Internet Explorer – 37.52% (44.84%)
3. Google Chrome – 14.58% (5.06%)
4. Apple Safari – 4.62% (3.4%)

As always, the more interesting thing than the topline numbers are the trends. The numbers in parentheses above are the market share percentages for each browser in December 2009 – one year ago. As you can see, Google is the only browser to experience significant growth in Europe over the past year.

And the North American numbers:

1. Internet Explorer – 48.92% (53.84%)
2. Firefox – 26.7% (30.68%)
3. Google Chrome – 12.82% (5.31%)
4. Apple Safari – 10.16% (7.94%)

The trends are generally the same across the world – IE slowly dripping support, Firefox flat to slightly down, and Chrome and Safari steadily gaining. Will the next generation of web users use Chrome and Safari as their preferred browsers, leaving Microsoft and Mozilla in the dust?

Android Set to Become #1 Mobile OS

According to a new market share survey from Nielson, here are the latest numbers in the mobile device operating system wars:

Mobile OS Market Share, November 2010
1. Apple iOS – 28.6%
2. RIM (Blackberry) – 26.1%
3. Android – 25.8%

These numbers don’t tell the whole story — this graph does, though. Android has been steadily increasing ever since its release, Apple is flat, and Blackberry has been declining for some time now:

The news is ever better for Google when you look at those people who have purchased a new phone in the past six months. Of those users, a whopping 40.8% chose Android while just 26% chose Apple and 19% chose Blackberry.

It could be as early as next month’s report that Google overtakes both RIM and Apple to claim the crown as the #1 mobile operating system. I’ve got to say, I am one of those recent purchasers who chose Android, and I’ve been completely satisfied thus far!