Revising the Story

I spent some time in between my jobs this morning starting in on some of the major revisions I’ve been wanting to make to my Torn Wineskins manuscript. I’ve rewritten much of the first chapter, cut some material from some of the history chapters, and added some more personal stories. I’ve also renamed most of the chapters to be simpler, more artistic, and flow through the story I’m attempting to tell more smoothly. Here’s a sneak peek for you, my readers:

  • Ch.1 – Stories
  • Ch.2 – Gods
  • Ch.3 – Fireflies
  • Ch.4 – Kings
  • Ch.5 – Fire
  • Ch.6 – Rebirth
  • Ch.7 – Rules
  • Ch.8 – Pride
  • Ch.9 – Freedom
  • Ch.10 – Wine
  • Ch.11 – God
  • Ch.12 – Breath
  • Ch.13 – Intersections
  • Ch.14 – Anchovies
  • Ch.15 – Feet
  • Ch.16 – Accomplices

There’s a lot more work to be done (and those new chapter titles might not make the cut either), but I hope to finish it quickly and get this resubmitted to all the agents and publishers out there. Thanks to those of you who have asked recently where I’m at in the whole process, and for your encouragement and prayers!

And, We’re Back

Now that I’ve finished the final draft of my book, tentatively titled Torn Wineskins, I feel like I have some free time to do the stuff that has been on the back burner.

Things like reading all the books on my list for 2011 – a list that continues to grow longer and longer.

Things like regularly write some blog posts here.

I’m excited to jump back into the swing of things here at Reflected Riddles, and to keep you posted on how the book publishing adventure is going. I’ve done all my edits on the book, and now I am going to let a small number of my most trusted friends take a peek and offer editing suggestions as well. While they do that, I will be writing an agent proposal — and when two or three of the chapters are good enough to send out, I will be sending this baby out to the world!

For now, I’m planning on resuming our normal flow of posts here at RR. Oh, and in exciting related news, I’m working on tweaking the comments here to hopefully encourage a little more conversation and dialog. Check it out and let me know what you think! My greatest goal for writing is to spark dialog. To get people thinking and talking. So anything I can do to make RR more conducive to that, I’ll do it!

As always, thanks for stopping by. I’m looking forward to chatting with you!

On Heaven and Hell

So there’s been a lot of talk on blogs, Twitter, and Facebook the past several days about the idea of heaven and hell — courtesy of Rob Bell’s controversial teaser video for his new book.

Chapter 13 of my book is dedicated to discussing the same topics, so I’d like to share some excerpts as a way to add my voice to the conversation – and also as a way to share my writing with you before my book gets published!

So click on the link below to download a PDF of some rough draft excerpts from the chapter.

These excerpts are less than half the chapter. For some really good conversations on what it means to have eternal life, the parable of the rich man and Lazarus, the story of the sheep and the goats, and the evolving Jewish perspectives of the afterlife, you’ll have to buy the book when it comes out!

Keep in mind that this will most likely push you out of your comfort zone. It’s designed to. And please remember that what I write is meant to start conversations, not end them. I’m not laying out a complete theology on heaven and hell (or anything else I write about). I’m just adding a valid perspective to the conversation, and I hope you’ll take it and dialog it – with me, with your friends, with your small group, with people who don’t know Jesus.

And I promise, promise, promise you that I came up with what is written on the top of page 7 several months ago, long before anyone had ever heard of the title of Rob Bell’s next book. :)

Chapter 13 – Heaven and Hell

There Be Giants

As I near the completion of the manuscript for my first book, many of you have asked what the process of publishing looks like – so I thought I’d explain it a little here, and confess some of the thoughts I have as I travel through that process.

Essentially, reputable publishers choose to work with agents and do not generally accept unsolicited manuscripts – especially from first-time authors like myself. So, most authors hire agents to review their manuscripts, pass them along to publishers, and advocate on the author’s behalf. These agents usually take an industry standard 15% of any publishing contract moneys (up front money as well as royalties later on down the road).

Agents will only accept manuscripts that are accompanied by a Book Proposal – a kind of cover letter document that contains a brief overview of the book, why the author thinks the book will sell, what market it will sell to, and why they are the best person to write the book. The Book Proposal also comes with 2-3 full chapters of the book attached. This way, the agent gets an idea of what the book is about, how well it is written, and what the writing style and skill level of the author is.

So my immediate goal is to finish the final two chapters of my book, draw up a Book Proposal, and start sending it off to agents to see if anyone will agree to represent me. Most agents have a particular genre of books they will specialize in, and so as I read I am learning it is vitally important to not just find a willing agent, but to find one that is a good fit for your style and topic of writing.

It was when I started checking around for available agents that all the feelings of doubt began surfacing in my mind. The whole idea of having an agent is to get your manuscript in front of publishers who don’t accept unsolicited manuscripts. But all the agent websites I looked at all said that they were not currently accepting unsolicited manuscripts either! I began to wonder how I’ll ever get someone to read my stuff.

I felt like the twelve spies sent to scout out the Promised Land in the book of Joshua, really. They had made it so far – they were on the cusp of the Promised Land after wandering in the desert for so long. They had made it! But when they looked to see what it would take to enter, they saw giants and got scared. They said it would be impossible.

Just like them, the process looks pretty impossible right now. But just like them, I need to remember that God is in control of this whole thing. I’m anxious, now that I’m on the cusp of the Promised Land, so to speak, with a nearly complete manuscript, to watch how God orchestrates things from here. I’ll keep you posted on how it’s going. Maybe if I get rejected by 27 different agents before getting rejected by 8 different publishers, my story will be an encouragement to other budding authors out there. Or, maybe God will make it really easy – who knows?

Here’s to the journey!

Sneak Peek: Chapter Titles

My book is coming along really nicely, and I hope to have it finished up here in the next month or two. As a special sneak peek, I thought I’d show you, my faithful readers, what I’ve tentatively outlined for the chapters in the book.

Conversation one is the interweaving of two stories: (1) our history as humanity through the five major culture shifts we’ve experienced (or are experiencing), and (2) my own personal history and background (chapters 3, 5, 7, and 9). This section comes to a climax as we shift into postmodernity — something that is currently underway. The chapters in conversation one are shorter than those in conversation two.

Conversation two uses the backdrop of that culture shift as an opportunity to reimagine our faith and rediscover the message and heart of God in order to reach the people around us. I’ve thrown in some section headings to kind of flesh out what these chapters will look like a little more.

Introduction

Conversation ONE: Where We’ve Been
Chapter 1: A Look Back
Chapter 2: This is Sparta (Ancient Culture to Hellenism)
Chapter 3: Religion By Process of Elimination
Chapter 4: Unification of Church and State (Hellenism to Medievalism)
Chapter 5: I’m On Fire
Chapter 6: Respect the Classics, Man (Medievalism to the Renaissance)
Chapter 7: Being a Jackass for Jesus
Chapter 8: Pride Before the Fall (The Renaissance to Modernity)
Chapter 9: It is for Freedom
Chapter 10: Philosophical Mumbo Jumbo (Modernity to Postmodernity)

Conversation TWO: Where We Can Go
Chapter 11: God
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*God is Love
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Black and White and Shades of Grey
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Useless and Obsolete Rules

Chapter 12: Scripture
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*God’s Breath
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Literally
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Rediscovering Narrative

Chapter 13: Heaven and Hell
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Our Heaven Fetish
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*The Fear-Driven Life
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*The End

Chapter 14: The Gospel
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Anchovy Prices
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*The Kingdom
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Evangelii

Chapter 15: Discipleship
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Fishermen and Tax Collectors
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Lovin’ Us Some Hierarchy
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Of Life and Love

Chapter 16: The Church
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Candles
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Doubt
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*God is Love

None of these chapter titles are set in stone, obviously, and some are more likely to change than others (chapter seven, for instance). But this should give you guys a pretty good idea of what the book is about and what I’ve been working on writing over the past year!

Sneak Peek: Chapter Titles

My book is coming along really nicely, and I hope to have it finished up here in the next month or two. As a special sneak peek, I thought I’d show you, my faithful readers, what I’ve tentatively outlined for the chapters in the book.

Conversation one is the interweaving of two stories: (1) our history as humanity through the five major culture shifts we’ve experienced (or are experiencing), and (2) my own personal history and background (chapters 3, 5, 7, and 9). This section comes to a climax as we shift into postmodernity — something that is currently underway. The chapters in conversation one are shorter than those in conversation two.

Conversation two uses the backdrop of that culture shift as an opportunity to reimagine our faith and rediscover the message and heart of God in order to reach the people around us. I’ve thrown in some section headings to kind of flesh out what these chapters will look like a little more.

Introduction

Conversation ONE: Where We’ve Been
Chapter 1: A Look Back
Chapter 2: This is Sparta (Ancient Culture to Hellenism)
Chapter 3: Religion By Process of Elimination
Chapter 4: Unification of Church and State (Hellenism to Medievalism)
Chapter 5: I’m On Fire
Chapter 6: Respect the Classics, Man (Medievalism to the Renaissance)
Chapter 7: Being a Jackass for Jesus
Chapter 8: Pride Before the Fall (The Renaissance to Modernity)
Chapter 9: It is for Freedom
Chapter 10: Philosophical Mumbo Jumbo (Modernity to Postmodernity)

Conversation TWO: Where We Can Go
Chapter 11: God
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*God is Love
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Black and White and Shades of Grey
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Useless and Obsolete Rules

Chapter 12: Scripture
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*God’s Breath
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Literally
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Rediscovering Narrative

Chapter 13: Heaven and Hell
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Our Heaven Fetish
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*The Fear-Driven Life
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*The End

Chapter 14: The Gospel
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Anchovy Prices
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*The Kingdom
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Evangelii

Chapter 15: Discipleship
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Fishermen and Tax Collectors
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Lovin’ Us Some Hierarchy
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Of Life and Love

Chapter 16: The Church
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Candles
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*Doubt
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp*God is Love

None of these chapter titles are set in stone, obviously, and some are more likely to change than others (chapter seven, for instance). But this should give you guys a pretty good idea of what the book is about and what I’ve been working on writing over the past year!

Thoughts on Writing

Writing is more difficult than I thought it would be. If you’re one of my close personal friends, you’ve heard me say that before. And it’s true.

As I sat one day and processed why that was the case, I realized it was because writing is an extension of who I am. What I put out there, you, the reader, take in and becomes a large part of how you see me. How you understand me. Who I am.

And so when I write, I have a tendency to want to be careful. To overexplain myself. To write longer posts or chapters than necessary. Because I don’t want you to misunderstand what I’m saying. But more importantly than that, I don’t want you to misunderstand who I am.

Like what happened on Monday here at TWM. I posted a blog entitled, “Why Church is Irrelevant” as a response to a blogger challenge from GaryMo. My thought process in framing the blog went something like this:

The church is in decline in America. The numbers and data are there to support that statement across every ideology, tradition, and metric. And it’s even worse broken down by generation. The younger people are, the less and less they find church relevant.

Here in my own home town, a recent survey showed 88-90% of people had no meaningful connection with a local church. And in that survey, “meaningful connection” was just defined as attending a church service once a month!

My heart ultimately is to reach that 90 plus percent of folks who find church irrelevant. That’s what I want to communicate to you. And as the church, we’re not going to do that unless we’re really honest with ourselves.

So I started thinking about all the reasons and excuses people use to justify why church is irrelevant to them, and I thought, “You know what would make a cool rhetorical impact? Combining all those excuses into one short narrative.” Then we, the church, might see more clearly where folks outside the church are coming from. I even began the paragraph with the phrase, “Stereotypically…” to denote that these are things that are overgeneralized from the non-church population.

It wasn’t how I felt about church. Most of them, anyhow. :) It was supposed to be how outsiders view the church. My purpose in writing “Why the Church is Irrelevant” was to get us to take a look at ourselves and ask if we could do something better. And then I ended the post with a positive example of what we could do to become relevant again: recapture the power of story.

Unfortunately, from feedback I received from a few people, the positive side was lost amidst what I didn’t intend to be negative. I wrote the post more hastily than I should have while I was writing several other posts that were scheduled for later in the week. And I just didn’t communicate effectively what was in my heart.

As someone who wants to be a writer, that’s tough to admit.

So I deleted the post. And I learned a lesson or two in the process. My heart is not to rag on the church. My heart is to make the church better. More effective. And I can be more effective in how I communicate those things to you, my readers. Thanks for helping me grow and learn. I pray that in some little way, I have and can do the same for you as well.

Thoughts on Writing

Writing is more difficult than I thought it would be. If you’re one of my close personal friends, you’ve heard me say that before. And it’s true.

As I sat one day and processed why that was the case, I realized it was because writing is an extension of who I am. What I put out there, you, the reader, take in and becomes a large part of how you see me. How you understand me. Who I am.

And so when I write, I have a tendency to want to be careful. To overexplain myself. To write longer posts or chapters than necessary. Because I don’t want you to misunderstand what I’m saying. But more importantly than that, I don’t want you to misunderstand who I am.

Like what happened on Monday here at TWM. I posted a blog entitled, “Why Church is Irrelevant” as a response to a blogger challenge from GaryMo. My thought process in framing the blog went something like this:

The church is in decline in America. The numbers and data are there to support that statement across every ideology, tradition, and metric. And it’s even worse broken down by generation. The younger people are, the less and less they find church relevant.

Here in my own home town, a recent survey showed 88-90% of people had no meaningful connection with a local church. And in that survey, “meaningful connection” was just defined as attending a church service once a month!

My heart ultimately is to reach that 90 plus percent of folks who find church irrelevant. That’s what I want to communicate to you. And as the church, we’re not going to do that unless we’re really honest with ourselves.

So I started thinking about all the reasons and excuses people use to justify why church is irrelevant to them, and I thought, “You know what would make a cool rhetorical impact? Combining all those excuses into one short narrative.” Then we, the church, might see more clearly where folks outside the church are coming from. I even began the paragraph with the phrase, “Stereotypically…” to denote that these are things that are overgeneralized from the non-church population.

It wasn’t how I felt about church. Most of them, anyhow. :) It was supposed to be how outsiders view the church. My purpose in writing “Why the Church is Irrelevant” was to get us to take a look at ourselves and ask if we could do something better. And then I ended the post with a positive example of what we could do to become relevant again: recapture the power of story.

Unfortunately, from feedback I received from a few people, the positive side was lost amidst what I didn’t intend to be negative. I wrote the post more hastily than I should have while I was writing several other posts that were scheduled for later in the week. And I just didn’t communicate effectively what was in my heart.

As someone who wants to be a writer, that’s tough to admit.

So I deleted the post. And I learned a lesson or two in the process. My heart is not to rag on the church. My heart is to make the church better. More effective. And I can be more effective in how I communicate those things to you, my readers. Thanks for helping me grow and learn. I pray that in some little way, I have and can do the same for you as well.

A Narrative

For the intro to my teaching yesterday morning, I rewrote a portion of 1 Samuel 21 as a narrative and asked a friend in the congregation to read it. It was fun to write, and I think it turned out pretty decently, so I thought I’d share it:

He knew the law. This man, this hunted man, knew the law. He understood the law. He had written songs about how beautiful the law was. He understood God delivered the Law to his people, and understood the ramifications of breaking the Law. And now, standing outside the doors of this holy sanctuary, he was about to willingly and consciously break the law.

He was on the run. The people chasing him had seemingly unlimited resources, unlimited men, and unlimited food. He had nothing except what was on his back. He had been forced to flee quickly, almost with no warning. He had no weapon. He had no food. He had no hope. The men who were after him were led by the King, and they didn’t want to just capture him. They wanted him dead. Despite his current lowly stature in society, he posed a threat to them because of what some believed his destiny included.

But standing here, he felt little else but despair. His stomach rumbled, angry at going hungry for several days now. He couldn’t keep going. He needed something. He needed to survive.

And so he stepped into the holy sanctuary and approached the priest, prepared to severely violate the very law he would later swear to uphold.

This priest, this man of God trembled with fright when he saw the man walking toward him. He recognized him as a local and unlikely military hero, and as the man hated by the King. Only trouble could come from this visit, he thought – and he had no idea how correct that thought was.

The priest slowly asked the man one question, afraid at what the answer might be: why are you here alone? Wrapped up in that one question was a multitude of emotions: doubt, worry, concern, fear. In that one question, the priest was seeking many answers. Why was he here? Where was the king? What was going on? And so he asked, and he waited for the answer he did not want to know.

The man, this hungry, hopeless, chased man knew that to tell the truth would mean to confirm this man of God’s deepest fears. He had no desire to involve anyone else in his flight across the country, especially not this innocent man who oversaw a house of worship. So he began the game of lying.

“I am here on official business of the King,” the man stated, beginning a string of outright falsehoods. “It’s a secret mission of which I am not permitted to speak. I have told the rest of my men to meet me down the road a ways. I am here seeking food for our group – five loaves of bread, if you have it.”

The priest was entirely skeptical, but appreciated the game of deception nonetheless. And he desired to help – there was only one problem.

“I don’t have any bread here except the bread that has been ceremonially consecrated to God. Under our Law, only priests can eat it.” He glanced at the man standing before him, a silent and desperate plea rising from his face. The priest felt something inside of him give way. Pity and compassion filled him, and he looked around to make sure no one was paying attention. There was only one man off in a corner, a man serving as shepherd for the King who was sent to this house of God for cleansing and purity sake. The priest looked back at his visitor and whispered, “Your, ahem, men – have they kept themselves from women on this journey of theirs?”

The visitor offered assurance that they had, and the web tangled a bit more.

“Okay,” said the priest, breathing a sigh deep from the depths of a conflicted soul. He quietly turned, entered the holy room where the consecrated bread was kept on the altar, and picked it up. He mouthed a prayer for forgiveness to his God as he became an accomplice in this life-saving ruse, and returned with the food in his still-trembling hands.

The site of the bread instantly filled the man with hope and made his stomach rumble even more loudly. But he had one more request to make – one more lie to tell. “I haven’t any weapon with me,” he explained to the priest. “You see, the King’s business – this secret mission I’m on – was so urgent I didn’t have time to gather my equipment before I left. Do you possibly have a sword or spear or anything here I could take on my mission?”

As far as lies went, the priest and his visitor both knew this was about as far-fetched as they came. But they both understood something as well. Men’s lives and well-being were at stake here, specifically this man standing in the house of God, breaking the Law of God. And so the priest offered the only weapon he possessed – a sword that belonged to a foe that this very visitor had slain; a sword that had now been consecrated to God in worship as well. The priest carefully removed it from its sacred wrapping, and, praying yet another prayer of forgiveness, handed it to the man.

With that, the man turned and exited that sanctuary. He stopped for a short while to devour some of the bread and then continued on his way, a hunted and marked man who was now filled with a little more energy to carry him on his way. And as Ahimelech the priest watched him disappear into the distance, he could have not known the man he had just broken the Law to assist would one day become the greatest King in the history of Israel – King David.

A Narrative

For the intro to my teaching yesterday morning, I rewrote a portion of 1 Samuel 21 as a narrative and asked a friend in the congregation to read it. It was fun to write, and I think it turned out pretty decently, so I thought I’d share it:

He knew the law. This man, this hunted man, knew the law. He understood the law. He had written songs about how beautiful the law was. He understood God delivered the Law to his people, and understood the ramifications of breaking the Law. And now, standing outside the doors of this holy sanctuary, he was about to willingly and consciously break the law.

He was on the run. The people chasing him had seemingly unlimited resources, unlimited men, and unlimited food. He had nothing except what was on his back. He had been forced to flee quickly, almost with no warning. He had no weapon. He had no food. He had no hope. The men who were after him were led by the King, and they didn’t want to just capture him. They wanted him dead. Despite his current lowly stature in society, he posed a threat to them because of what some believed his destiny included.

But standing here, he felt little else but despair. His stomach rumbled, angry at going hungry for several days now. He couldn’t keep going. He needed something. He needed to survive.

And so he stepped into the holy sanctuary and approached the priest, prepared to severely violate the very law he would later swear to uphold.

This priest, this man of God trembled with fright when he saw the man walking toward him. He recognized him as a local and unlikely military hero, and as the man hated by the King. Only trouble could come from this visit, he thought – and he had no idea how correct that thought was.

The priest slowly asked the man one question, afraid at what the answer might be: why are you here alone? Wrapped up in that one question was a multitude of emotions: doubt, worry, concern, fear. In that one question, the priest was seeking many answers. Why was he here? Where was the king? What was going on? And so he asked, and he waited for the answer he did not want to know.

The man, this hungry, hopeless, chased man knew that to tell the truth would mean to confirm this man of God’s deepest fears. He had no desire to involve anyone else in his flight across the country, especially not this innocent man who oversaw a house of worship. So he began the game of lying.

“I am here on official business of the King,” the man stated, beginning a string of outright falsehoods. “It’s a secret mission of which I am not permitted to speak. I have told the rest of my men to meet me down the road a ways. I am here seeking food for our group – five loaves of bread, if you have it.”

The priest was entirely skeptical, but appreciated the game of deception nonetheless. And he desired to help – there was only one problem.

“I don’t have any bread here except the bread that has been ceremonially consecrated to God. Under our Law, only priests can eat it.” He glanced at the man standing before him, a silent and desperate plea rising from his face. The priest felt something inside of him give way. Pity and compassion filled him, and he looked around to make sure no one was paying attention. There was only one man off in a corner, a man serving as shepherd for the King who was sent to this house of God for cleansing and purity sake. The priest looked back at his visitor and whispered, “Your, ahem, men – have they kept themselves from women on this journey of theirs?”

The visitor offered assurance that they had, and the web tangled a bit more.

“Okay,” said the priest, breathing a sigh deep from the depths of a conflicted soul. He quietly turned, entered the holy room where the consecrated bread was kept on the altar, and picked it up. He mouthed a prayer for forgiveness to his God as he became an accomplice in this life-saving ruse, and returned with the food in his still-trembling hands.

The site of the bread instantly filled the man with hope and made his stomach rumble even more loudly. But he had one more request to make – one more lie to tell. “I haven’t any weapon with me,” he explained to the priest. “You see, the King’s business – this secret mission I’m on – was so urgent I didn’t have time to gather my equipment before I left. Do you possibly have a sword or spear or anything here I could take on my mission?”

As far as lies went, the priest and his visitor both knew this was about as far-fetched as they came. But they both understood something as well. Men’s lives and well-being were at stake here, specifically this man standing in the house of God, breaking the Law of God. And so the priest offered the only weapon he possessed – a sword that belonged to a foe that this very visitor had slain; a sword that had now been consecrated to God in worship as well. The priest carefully removed it from its sacred wrapping, and, praying yet another prayer of forgiveness, handed it to the man.

With that, the man turned and exited that sanctuary. He stopped for a short while to devour some of the bread and then continued on his way, a hunted and marked man who was now filled with a little more energy to carry him on his way. And as Ahimelech the priest watched him disappear into the distance, he could have not known the man he had just broken the Law to assist would one day become the greatest King in the history of Israel – King David.