How Millenial Are You?

Pew Research, one of the most trusted names in public opinion polling, recently did a cross-generational survey to see what the differences on 14 areas were across 4 generations. These areas ranged from whether or not you read a daily newspaper to if you’ve set up a social media profile to if you have a land line phone. Interesting stuff!

They broke up the respondents into the Silent Generation (born 1928-1945), the Boomers (1946-1964), Gen X (1965-1979), and the Millenials (1981+). And then, rather than simply report the findings of their survey, they made a website where you can answer the same 14 questions and find out which generation you best fit into.

Being 30 years old, I am right on the bubble between Gen X and the Millenial generations, so I’m always interested to see where I fall on various surveys and questionnaires. This one surprised me.

My score was an 83, which put me well over into the Millenial generation. (average score for Millenials: 73. Average for Gen X: 33. Wow.)

The hardest question to answer for me was how important it was to me to live a “religious life”. Since I don’t think my definition and their definition of “religious” come close to one another, I tried to ascertain what they meant and said it was one of the most important things to me. That actually lowered my score by 4 points.

After you answer the questions, you can see the survey responses and the generational trends. It’s really interesting stuff. So now it’s your turn: how millenial are you? What generation do you “fit” in according to Pew? Take the survey and post your score in the comments!

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How Millenial Are You?

Pew Research, one of the most trusted names in public opinion polling, recently did a cross-generational survey to see what the differences on 14 areas were across 4 generations. These areas ranged from whether or not you read a daily newspaper to if you’ve set up a social media profile to if you have a land line phone. Interesting stuff!

They broke up the respondents into the Silent Generation (born 1928-1945), the Boomers (1946-1964), Gen X (1965-1979), and the Millenials (1981+). And then, rather than simply report the findings of their survey, they made a website where you can answer the same 14 questions and find out which generation you best fit into.

Being 30 years old, I am right on the bubble between Gen X and the Millenial generations, so I’m always interested to see where I fall on various surveys and questionnaires. This one surprised me.

My score was an 83, which put me well over into the Millenial generation. (average score for Millenials: 73. Average for Gen X: 33. Wow.)

The hardest question to answer for me was how important it was to me to live a “religious life”. Since I don’t think my definition and their definition of “religious” come close to one another, I tried to ascertain what they meant and said it was one of the most important things to me. That actually lowered my score by 4 points.

After you answer the questions, you can see the survey responses and the generational trends. It’s really interesting stuff. So now it’s your turn: how millenial are you? What generation do you “fit” in according to Pew? Take the survey and post your score in the comments!

11 thoughts on “How Millenial Are You?

  1. Hey Matt–that comment right above this in the Chinese characters with the one English word "Sex" in it–I got that same comment on my blog? What's up with that??

    You mean a 16 doesn't mean I'm an old fart? I do have a tattoo, you know. Bill got a 23.

    Reply

  2. Jen, who knows? Some Chinese spam guy trying to give us all viruses, I assume. So kind of them to share with all of us.

    16 doesn't mean you're an old fart – it just means you act like one. :) :) I'm assuming your lack of texting probably brought you down pretty far on their scale.

    Reply

  3. Jen, it simply means that you exhibit more of the characteristics that are common among Gen X'ers or Baby Boomers than those apparent in Millenials, that's all. Not good or bad, just an interesting way to find out something about yourself (according to Pew, anyway). :)

    Reply

  4. hetyd, that's a good observation. I heard the term "Gen Jones" for the first time about six months ago, and have seen it a couple other places since then.

    You are absolutely correct that "Generations are a function of the common formative experiences of its members, not the fertility rates of its parents." It will be interesting to see how sociologists and other soft sciences continue to define and redefine these generational differences.

    Reply

  5. Interesting blog. This piece is missing an important part of the equation: Generation Jones (between the Boomers and Generation X). Pew is one of the pollsters who is still behind the curve and doesn't break out GenJones seperately, while more up-to-date pollsters now regularly include GenJones. Given that GenJones voters were almost a full third of the 2008 electorate, this is an unfortunate ommission by Pew.

    Google Generation Jones, and you’ll see it’s gotten lots of media attention, and many top commentators from many top publications and networks (Washington Post, Time magazine, NBC, Newsweek, ABC, etc.) now specifically use this term. In fact, the Associated Press' annual Trend Report chose the Rise of Generation Jones as the #1 trend of 2009. Here's a page with a good overview of recent media interest in GenJones: http://generationjones.com/2009latest.html

    It is important to distinguish between the post-WWII demographic boom in births vs. the cultural generations born during that era. Generations are a function of the common formative experiences of its members, not the fertility rates of its parents. And most analysts now see generations as getting shorter (usually 10-15 years now), partly because of the acceleration of culture. Many experts now believe it breaks down more or less this way:

    DEMOGRAPHIC boom in babies: 1946-1964
    Baby Boom GENERATION: 1942-1953
    Generation Jones: 1954-1965
    Generation X: 1966-1978
    Generation Y/Millennials: 1979-1993

    Reply

  6. Hey Matt–that comment right above this in the Chinese characters with the one English word "Sex" in it–I got that same comment on my blog? What's up with that??

    You mean a 16 doesn't mean I'm an old fart? I do have a tattoo, you know. Bill got a 23.

    Reply

  7. Jen, it simply means that you exhibit more of the characteristics that are common among Gen X'ers or Baby Boomers than those apparent in Millenials, that's all. Not good or bad, just an interesting way to find out something about yourself (according to Pew, anyway). :)

    Reply

  8. Interesting blog. This piece is missing an important part of the equation: Generation Jones (between the Boomers and Generation X). Pew is one of the pollsters who is still behind the curve and doesn't break out GenJones seperately, while more up-to-date pollsters now regularly include GenJones. Given that GenJones voters were almost a full third of the 2008 electorate, this is an unfortunate ommission by Pew.

    Google Generation Jones, and you’ll see it’s gotten lots of media attention, and many top commentators from many top publications and networks (Washington Post, Time magazine, NBC, Newsweek, ABC, etc.) now specifically use this term. In fact, the Associated Press' annual Trend Report chose the Rise of Generation Jones as the #1 trend of 2009. Here's a page with a good overview of recent media interest in GenJones: http://generationjones.com/2009latest.html

    It is important to distinguish between the post-WWII demographic boom in births vs. the cultural generations born during that era. Generations are a function of the common formative experiences of its members, not the fertility rates of its parents. And most analysts now see generations as getting shorter (usually 10-15 years now), partly because of the acceleration of culture. Many experts now believe it breaks down more or less this way:

    DEMOGRAPHIC boom in babies: 1946-1964
    Baby Boom GENERATION: 1942-1953
    Generation Jones: 1954-1965
    Generation X: 1966-1978
    Generation Y/Millennials: 1979-1993

    Reply

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